SHO OKAWA

SHO OKAWA

2009 Identified as gifted at the age of nine by the Canadian government. Skipped junior high school and started secondary school.
Jun. 2014 Graduated from Thomas Haney Secondary School at the age of 14. Accepted and won scholarships from multiple world top 30 universities including UBC, the University of Toronto and McGill University.
Sep. 2014 Entered the Faculty of Science at UBC.
Jan. 2015 Received the Governor General’s Academic Medal of Canada.
May-Jun. 2017 Research work on NAT1 under Dr. Shinya Yamanaka at the Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco, US
May 2018 Graduated from the UBC Honours Biology Program at the age of 18.
May 2018 Graduated from the UBC Honours Biology Program at the age of 18.
Aug. 2018 – Aug. 2020 Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, the University of Tokyo (Associate Professor Nozomu Yachie’s lab)
Apr. 2019 Entered Master’s program at Keio University
Apr. 2019 Presentation at the conference of the Laboratory for Systems Biology and Medicine, Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, the University of Tokyo (on the development of a “DNA public key cryptosystem” to support next-generation information infrastructure)
Aug. – Oct. 2019 Research on “SMD-DMS” at the University of Toronto as a joint project officer of the University of Toronto, the University of Tokyo’s Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, and Keio University.
Nov. 2019 Research presentation at ICSB2019(Barcode Split Genetics: A DNA based public key cryptography system)
Sep. 2020 Entered PhD Program, UBC, School of Biomedical Engineering(SBME)
Mar. 2021 Earned Master’s Degree in Systems Biology in Media and Governance, Keio University
Jun. 2022 Research presentation at SBME Annual Symposium & SBME Research Day (Deciphering the Phosphocode of Cell Differentiation and Development)
Present The University of British Columbia (UBC) , School of Biomedical Engineering (SBME), PhD Program

Currently, I’m a PhD student at UBC’s Yachie Lab in the Biomedical Engineering Program. My research interest spans synthetic biology and I’m particularly keen on learning and applying the latest technologies to decipher phosphorylation networks relevant to mammalian differentiation. As a member of the Masason Foundation, I’m passionate about spreading STEM interest in students. Last year, I’ve co-founded a club for graduate students to give seminars of research to local high-school students as well as create simple yet instructional videos on advanced topics in biology! Our goal is to create an international alliance among graduate students to share their research interest to the world, igniting interest in our respective research fields while improving our scientific communication skills.